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Thursday, December 14, 2017

Articles

Articles


Founded in 1932, the Courtauld Institute of Art not only houses one of the finest small collections in the world, but is also regarded as one of the leading centers for the study of art history and conservation. The result…
Posted on Thursday, 16 June 2011 22:42
William Samuel Schwartz (1896–1977) was quite a character. His quirky handlebar mustache and voluptuous head of hair matched his quick wit, multilingual tongue, and penchant for opera. Schwartz’s oeuvre included landscapes, portraits, and still lifes. His imagination often penetrated the…
Posted on Thursday, 16 June 2011 01:34
Located in the Duke of York Square, one of London’s most posh areas, The BADA (British Antique Dealers’ Association) Antiques and Fine Art Fair enjoyed another successful year. Founded nineteen years ago, the Fair brings together the best art and…
Posted on Thursday, 16 June 2011 01:23
Maastricht, a picturesque medieval city steeped in history, filled with romantic streets and historic buildings, and arguably the oldest city in the Netherlands, is home once a year to the finest art and antiques show in the world, TEFAF Maastricht.…
Posted on Thursday, 16 June 2011 01:17
Guided by spiritual leader George Rapp (1757–1847), a community of German Lutheran separatists, numbering some five hundred emigrants, gathered in Philadelphia and Baltimore in 1804 to trek westward. Their destination was land they had purchased about thirty-five miles north of…
Posted on Thursday, 16 June 2011 01:10
Many people still think only of Rufus Porter (1792–1884) when they discuss New England landscape murals of the 1825–1845 period. Current research poses the probability, however, that in fact muralist Jonathan D. Poor (1807–1845) was much more prolific than Porter,…
Posted on Thursday, 16 June 2011 00:55
Artists have explored the human face since ancient times. About Face: Portraiture as Subject at the Blanton Museum of Art, University of Texas at Austin, gathers together a choice selection of portraits in diverse mediums and across a range of…
Posted on Thursday, 16 June 2011 00:39
During the past twenty-five years, Jack Huber, Dartmouth Class of 1963, and his wife, Russell, have built a distinguished collection of American art dating from roughly 1885 to 1920, an era characterized by dramatic social, cultural, and artistic change. Embracing…
Posted on Thursday, 16 June 2011 00:00
The Salmagundi Club in Manhattan, one of the oldest art clubs in America, is featuring an exhibition on one of the country's great artist families. Wiggins, Wiggins & Wiggins brings together a selection of works by J. Carleton Wiggins (1848–1932),…
Posted on Wednesday, 15 June 2011 23:48
The island of Nantucket, located south of Cape Cod off the coast of Massachusetts, boasts a rich maritime history and one of the highest concentrations of pre-Civil War structures in the United States. In 1894, the children and grandchildren of…
Posted on Wednesday, 15 June 2011 23:35
It is often said that during the latter half of the twentieth century, Manhattan became the center of the art world. But that change happened by degrees, as new influences led to new movements, gradually producing an art that was…
Posted on Wednesday, 15 June 2011 23:18
Neoclassicism is the name given to the various classicizing styles that developed in Europe in the later eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and which profoundly influenced the fine arts, decorative arts, and architecture. Artists and craftsmen found inspiration in the…
Posted on Friday, 22 April 2011 23:53
When the Northwest Territory opened in 1788, settlers, lured by inexpensive, abundant land, flooded west into what would become Ohio. The federal government had divided up the land into a number of sections, with parts intended as payment to Revolutionary…
Posted on Friday, 22 April 2011 23:45
Research on a group of related folk art portraits has yet to yield the identity of the artist. There are neither signed examples nor enough identified sitters within the group to help establish a geographic foundation to support an attribution.…
Posted on Friday, 22 April 2011 23:42
During the last seventy-five years, Piedmont North Carolina factories in towns such as Lexington, Thomasville, and Hickory have produced some of the most recognized fine wood furniture in the United States. Not as well known but equally significant, however, is…
Posted on Friday, 22 April 2011 23:38
In his seminal monograph The Moravian Potters in North Carolina (1972) decorative arts scholar John Bivins used archaeological evidence, surviving artifacts, and the Moravians’ meticulous records to illuminate the lives and work of potters active in Bethabara and Salem.1 The…
Posted on Thursday, 21 April 2011 00:15
This year is the bicentennial of George Caleb Bingham’s (1811–1879) birth (Fig. 1). Born on March 20, 1811, in Virginia, Bingham came to central Missouri with his family in 1819.1 Living first in Franklin and then Arrow Rock, Bingham demonstrated…
Posted on Thursday, 21 April 2011 00:12
From what appears to be just another expanse of rolling hills and vast meadows in the Hudson Valley region of upstate New York, rises a massive, long-limbed structure. Commanding in its enormity and graceful in its composition, Mark di Suvero’s…
Posted on Thursday, 21 April 2011 00:09
This year marks the sesquicentennial of the fall of Fort Sumter and the start of the American Civil War (1861-1865). Oddly, the war coincided with the richest and most successful phase of the career of America’s most renowned nineteenth-century landscape…
Posted on Wednesday, 20 April 2011 00:54
The essentials of childhood form us all. Even when we rebel against them, our thoughts, beliefs, dreams, and preferences are consequences of our birthplace and earliest years, and Edward Hopper (1882–1967) was no exception. His artistic personality was shaped by…
Posted on Wednesday, 20 April 2011 00:49
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